Web Monitoring

Web Site Monitoring and Performance Insights

Effective Web Load Testing for Application Performance

Web load testing lets you test and analyze software applications in determining performance, capacity and transaction handling capabilities in a real world usage condition. With the help of these tests and measurements, the web load testing tools should help pinpoint bottle necks with root cause analysis helping IT staff in better planning of computing resources.

The analysis from load tests provide guidance to the IT staff allowing them to make better decisions with respect to applications and the technology involved.  Load testing being an ongoing process, needs to be regularly scheduled in sync, throughout the lifecycle of an application.

Web application load testing should be considered as part of the overall strategy. IT Teams must include, and develop a testing approach throughout the life-cycle of the application including the development stages. Load testing is required at all critical stages of the application lifecycle, from design and development till the production stages.

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August 9, 2011 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , , | Leave a comment

Capacity And Scalability Of Business And Mission Critical Web Sites

Knowing the capacity and scalability of business and mission critical Web sites is extremely important and proper load testing is the best way to acquire this knowledge. When web load testing is not done properly, the results are at best useless and, in the worst case, misleading, causing a company to either underestimate or overestimate a site’s capacity. This wrong result could cause unnecessary expenses, delays or potentially disastrous business decisions.

Unless you do a retinal scan on your visitors, the information you get is not going to be as accurate as you might like. However, knowing unique users is still extremely useful and necessary for load testing.

Read More on The Science of Web Based Testing.

February 22, 2011 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , | Leave a comment

Online Behavior Variables and Web Load Testing

Online behavior variables deal with behavioral differences between users. Some users, for example, read Web pages and navigate Web sites faster than others; we call this difference User Interaction Speed.

Interaction speed is very relevant because, in a given amount of time, a fast user is able to go through more Web pages than a slower user. This results in more requests and therefore a higher load, for the Web site under test. These variables are used in combination with other Web site Usage Signature variables to create realistic distributions.

Web load testing that does not consider these variations is simply not realistic and will generate misleading results. By combining the average viewing time with the user interaction speed variable and taking into account the user’s familiarity with the Web site, you create loads that simulate real usage much more accurately.

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February 1, 2011 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , | Leave a comment

Passive Measurements Must Capture Behavior & Experience Of Real Application Users

Measurements of real workloads are referred to as passive measurements, because the act of measurement involves simply observing an application’s behavior under normal usage conditions and recording what happens. Active measurements, in contrast, are obtained by generating synthetic application traffic. For example, one might measure a system’s maximum capacity by emulating a mix of user actions and increasing the number of simulated users until a component of the system saturates. Note that the passive and active measurement approaches differ only in the way application traffic is generated—both still require mechanisms to measure how the system behaves in response to that traffic.

Passive measurements must capture the behavior and experience of real application users, while active measurements must do the same for synthetic users. So both approaches must deal with the same set of technical complications created by the need to measure Rich Internet Applications.

Although active measurements do impose extra traffic, they rarely distort a system’s behavior sufficiently to affect the validity of the results. For a typical e-business application, the number of additional active measurements required to sample the system and obtain useful data is usually insignificant compared with normal traffic volumes. Thus normal levels of application responsiveness and availability can be measured using either active or passive methods. Load testing on the other hand normally involves active measurement of a portion of the system that is isolated from real users for the purpose of the test.

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January 4, 2011 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , , | Leave a comment

Requirements For Load Testing

Sophisticated requirements for load testing in a QoE context go beyond basic web performance metrics, as they depend on effectively modeling different user profiles in terms of technology dimensions (e.g., fast versus slow Internet connections) and “human” dimensions (e.g., impatient versus patient users, skilled versus unskilled users).

LoadPro 2.0 builds on a solid foundation for QoE designed to support different constituencies through targeted reports, as well as real-time insights into website performance. LoadPro leverages the industry’s most extensive testing infrastructure for load testing outside the firewall, as well as advanced behavioral modeling in its extensive library of synthetic tests. These combine technical and behavioral characteristics that leverage Keynote’s extensive experience in modeling response requirements across vertically-defined markets in different geographies.

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December 21, 2010 Posted by | Website Performance | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why Web Load Test?

With the ever changing world Web sites are mission critical. Most websites are a major source of revenue for their company. Most companies realize the value of a web load test, and they are concerned about load testing their production website.

With newer technologies, websites are implemented with a variety of software, hardware and services. Software’s include operating systems, databases, application servers, etc. Hardware’s include routers, load balancers, firewalls, etc. Likewise for the services, components come from different vendors, and each component has a unique performance and scalability profile.  A small difference in any of these components can dramatically change the scalability of the entire system.

Creating a clone of the production system with the same performance and scalability characteristics as the original is very difficult, unless the system under test is extremely simple. Even if the production system can be cloned, the costs associated with recreating such a system with the accuracy required to make the load test results on the clone be applicable to the production system will be significant. Since in order to be valid, a complete Web site load test must include all components.

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December 7, 2010 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , | Leave a comment

Is Load Testing Really An Expensive Proposition?

Organizations need  quick web monitoring and diagnostic information when a high volume of transactions are involved. A competitive  edge is much required over monitoring website with deep insight into the performance of your application, Web and server infrastructure.

Coming to think of load testing, companies often see load testing as an expensive proposition. And when you consider the hidden costs of a software-based solution, it’s easy to see why. Software vendors charge expensive license fees upfront, as well as annual maintenance fees that can add as much as 20% of your total cost. These fees must be paid regardless of how much or how little you use the solution. With LoadPro, you only pay for the testing services you actually use—and you do not have to worry about add-on consulting or infrastructure expenditures.

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October 12, 2010 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , | Leave a comment

Analyzing software applications and supporting infrastructures

Business requirements for web application monitoring and  load testing as a means for ongoing performance measurement and tuning have become more rigorous over the past several years.

Load testing is the process of analyzing software applications and supporting infrastructures to determine acceptable performance, scalability, capacity and transaction handling capabilities by modeling real-world application usage conditions and executing them against the application and supporting infrastructure under test.

Measurements derived with load testing tools should provide a clear understanding of where website performance bottlenecks reside and aid in infrastructure and capacity planning of computing resources.

When derived from meaningful load tests, results serve as a guide to helping IT staff make informed decisions about the performance of their applications and infrastructures. Accurate and realistic load tests are the best indicator of how well any business system is able to service its customers in real-world scenarios.

August 23, 2010 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , , | Leave a comment

The right metrics for web load testing

Ideally, a user session would be defined as a visit by a unique user. The problem with this definition is that the concept of unique user is easier to describe than to measure. It’s important to understand that, unless you do a retinal scan on your visitors, the information you get is not going to be as accurate as you might like. However, knowing unique users is still extremely useful and necessary for load testing. Having ruled out retinal scans, the best way to know that a user is unique is to request a user name and password every time the user visits the Web site. This is clearly slow and impractical for most Web sites. The next most accurate way to determine the uniqueness of a user is to use cookies.

A load test that does not consider these variations is simply not realistic and will generate misleading results. By combining the average viewing time with the user interaction speed variable and taking into account the user’s familiarity with the Web site, you create loads that simulate real usage much more accurately.

Web load testing is the most effective way to gauge a Web site’s capacity and scalability, but load tests that don’t simulate real scenarios can be
dangerously misleading.

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August 5, 2010 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , | Leave a comment

Monitoring application performance on the web

For business needs and user demands to be met, a website needs to go through a series of tests and validations before the credentials are met. Web applications play a major role in today’s web sites as the user interface and interaction happens the most that this point. Monitoring website, its  applications and testing under different circumstances both from outside and inside the firewall would definitely help in figuring out a better performing website.

Web applications need to be tested at with different loads and at different stress levels with load testing and stress testing keeping internet speeds in mind, considering all the probable combination’s when it comes to web performance.

Web application monitoring would let us know the application’s threshold point and in managing the data sets in terms of searches from the users, be it for a single large data set or multiple requests. Browser dependencies should also be checked followed by verification and validation with the check for any new bugs with the new versions. Also a check mainly with reference to the UI perspective and security.

April 21, 2010 Posted by | web application monitoring, Web Performance Testing | , , , , | Leave a comment