Web Monitoring

Web Site Monitoring and Performance Insights

Why Testing Web 2.0 Sites Requires Real Browser Measurements

We commonly hear the term ―Web 2.0, but if you ask someone, ―What is Web 2.0? you will get many different answers. Some people call it a technology, but it is really the second generation of Web development and design.

This second generation includes tools that enable better collaboration, communication, and interoperability on the World Wide Web. Social networking sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and YouTube are good examples of the information sharing and collaboration that we call Web 2.0. Among Web 2.0 applications, there is a class of Rich Internet Applications that are made possible by technologies such as Ajax/JavaScript, CSS, DHTML/XHTML, and Flash/Silverlight, all working together.

Web Application Monitoring

Nowadays, the most engaging Web applications rely on the browser to also execute code and redisplay content, often requiring the browser to process code that requires a desktop engine, such as JavaScript engine built into the browser, or a Flash player installed as a Web plug-in. The Web operating system is no longer just resident on the server, it is also on the user’s desktop, in the client-based browser.

Related Posts

1. Monitoring Web APIs

2. Mobile website or HTML5 app

3. Mobile Browser Compatibility

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January 28, 2013 Posted by | Rich Internet Applications, web application monitoring | , | Leave a comment

Web Applications from a Business Perspective

What does Web application performance mean to you? Most business executives would evaluate the success of a Web application by looking at business performance metrics such as revenue, costs, and customer satisfaction. Because an application may be created to serve customers, partners, members of an organization, or employees, the relative importance of those metrics may vary.

Application utility is tied to user behavior, which is driven by the clarity of the site, the design of the user interface, and the responsiveness of interactions between client and server components. The design and implementation of those components ultimately also determines application availability.

For any Web application, effectiveness means simply fulfilling the planned design and delivery objectives, delivering online experiences that lead to satisfied customers, and so meeting the intended business performance goals.

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September 7, 2011 Posted by | web application monitoring | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Evolution of user experiences with web application utility

User experiences and web application utility has evolved with the evolution of web technologies.  With There is a gradual transition of web applications from the thin client model to a richer distributed function model.  Successful implementation, we will need to reevaluate our approaches considering a few challenges:

• how to measure an RIA user’s experience of response time;

• how to break apart into meaningful components the time it takes to complete a business transaction;

• how to monitor the performance of a production application, and alert when its behavior is abnormal;

• how to change development and systems management processes to ensure successful implementations

The two main reasons for measuring the performance of a distributed application are to determine how quickly users can achieve their goals, and to discover how a system behaves under increasing load. Web application monitoring and measurement focuses on the user’s experience or on the system’s behavior. Despite differences, these two classes of measurement activity share many technical problems. Web monitoring tools measure synthetic workloads, while passive tools measure the system activity generated by real users.

Read More on Rich Internet Applications

 

February 8, 2011 Posted by | Rich Internet Applications, web application monitoring | , , , | Leave a comment

Passive Measurements Must Capture Behavior & Experience Of Real Application Users

Measurements of real workloads are referred to as passive measurements, because the act of measurement involves simply observing an application’s behavior under normal usage conditions and recording what happens. Active measurements, in contrast, are obtained by generating synthetic application traffic. For example, one might measure a system’s maximum capacity by emulating a mix of user actions and increasing the number of simulated users until a component of the system saturates. Note that the passive and active measurement approaches differ only in the way application traffic is generated—both still require mechanisms to measure how the system behaves in response to that traffic.

Passive measurements must capture the behavior and experience of real application users, while active measurements must do the same for synthetic users. So both approaches must deal with the same set of technical complications created by the need to measure Rich Internet Applications.

Although active measurements do impose extra traffic, they rarely distort a system’s behavior sufficiently to affect the validity of the results. For a typical e-business application, the number of additional active measurements required to sample the system and obtain useful data is usually insignificant compared with normal traffic volumes. Thus normal levels of application responsiveness and availability can be measured using either active or passive methods. Load testing on the other hand normally involves active measurement of a portion of the system that is isolated from real users for the purpose of the test.

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January 4, 2011 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , , | Leave a comment

Analyzing software applications and supporting infrastructures

Business requirements for web application monitoring and  load testing as a means for ongoing performance measurement and tuning have become more rigorous over the past several years.

Load testing is the process of analyzing software applications and supporting infrastructures to determine acceptable performance, scalability, capacity and transaction handling capabilities by modeling real-world application usage conditions and executing them against the application and supporting infrastructure under test.

Measurements derived with load testing tools should provide a clear understanding of where website performance bottlenecks reside and aid in infrastructure and capacity planning of computing resources.

When derived from meaningful load tests, results serve as a guide to helping IT staff make informed decisions about the performance of their applications and infrastructures. Accurate and realistic load tests are the best indicator of how well any business system is able to service its customers in real-world scenarios.

August 23, 2010 Posted by | Web Load Testing | , , , , | Leave a comment

Web performance management with the right metrics

Inaccurate data undermines the effectiveness of any program of systematic web performance management and causes performance-tuning skills and resources to be applied in ways that are not optimal. It can also lead to unproductive interdepartmental conflicts and disputes over service-level agreements with internal or external service providers.

Website performance management activities depends crucially on an organization’s ability to gather and report meaningful, timely, and accurate measurement data with the focus on the right metrics.

Application utility is tied to user behavior, which is driven by the clarity of the site, the design of the user interface, and the responsiveness of interactions between client and server components.

Read more on Web Application Monitoring solutions.

August 9, 2010 Posted by | Website Performance | , , | Leave a comment

Monitoring the last mile

The Internet is being reinvented, morphing into a medium capable of delivering extremely interactive and rich experiences. While this
next wave of Web sites and experiences holds significant promise in terms of customer retention, interaction, and revenue growth, it also poses new challenges.

A poor online experience translates directly to less satisfied users, poorer brand perception, and higher costs. The combination of new technology and higher user expectations creates significant challenges to managing the online experience.

Measuring and monitoring website and Web applications on a timely, incremental basis throughout the day using agent-based web  monitoring in realistic yet consistent scenarios continues to be the most popular andviable form of monitoring.

Read more about monitoring transactions in the last mile.

July 15, 2010 Posted by | website monitoring | , | Leave a comment

The Challenge With Website Performance

In most cases a users impression is built on how fast your site loads. Modern websites not only need to perform well, but need to possess the rich features of the web 2.0 world. With a focus of having rich features of java, flash and java-script libraries, you still need to have a high performing website. With the ever improving web 2.0 technologies our web pages have got more rich and diverse. It is definitely a challenge for the engineers to maximize web site performance.

Web pages have gotten more complex and heavier with all the media and site components. Evolution in the area of web performance is fast and complex with these changes, it is quite challenging to track your website in terms of loads and performance. There are always interaction with the java scripts, css and web applications and these days with a lot of focus being on the front end architecture of websites, transaction monitoring and web application monitoring are some of the main areas of focus for businesses.

May 20, 2010 Posted by | Web Monitoring | , , , | Leave a comment

Real Browsers, do they really matter?

Website Performance Monitoring is a discipline for IT operations and Ecommerce business management teams that includes both operational
monitoring and end-user experience monitoring.

Operational Monitoring helps operations teams implement dependable end to-end performance monitoring for critical Web applications as a turn-key service, and is achieved with high-frequency application monitoring that detects response time and availability issues in real time.

End-user Experience Monitoring is the domain of both operations teams and performance analysts, who need to most accurately measure the performance of critical Web transactions, including those involving interactive Flash, from the true end user’s perspective. This gives full visibility into the user’s experience by providing real browser measurements of the responsiveness and availability of RIAs.

Source : Web application monitoring

March 2, 2010 Posted by | website monitoring services | , | Leave a comment

Web performance through RIA measurement

Two main reasons for measuring the web performance of a distributed application are to determine how quickly users can achieve their goals, and to discover how a system behaves under increasing load. The first focuses directly on the users’ experience, the second investigates underlying server behaviors that, in turn, will determine what users experience.

Measurement usually focuses on the user’s experience or on the system’s behavior. Despite differences, these two classes of measurement activity share many technical problems. Measurement activities and tasks may focus on a variety of possible sub-goals.

Know more on application performance testing at Keynote.

February 24, 2010 Posted by | web application monitoring | , , , | Leave a comment