Web Monitoring

Web Site Monitoring and Performance Insights

The challenge of keeping up with customers on the go

Recent web traffic analysis shows that many Social Retailers are getting an enormous amount of traffic from mobile devices.  In the case of LivingSocial, they’re getting more traffic from mobile than the desktop.  Breaking down mobile traffic between the apps and the mobile web, the web is preferred over apps nearly two-fold.  This affinity of LivingSocial users for mobile websites is in line with general mobile retail shopping preference finding revealed in a recent Keynote Mobile Study.

So it would stand to reason that LivingSocial is doing everything possible to maximize the performance of their websites on mobile devices (smartphones and tablets).  Yet, looking at results in the Keynote Startup 3-Screen Index, their performance isn’t where you’d hope it would be.  On tablets the 43.9 second average response time of their site is downright painful, faring far worse than the average startup.

But the mobile challenge LivingSocial faces is ones other companies would love to have.  Their customers and prospects are actively seeking them out on mobile devices and with a few improvements, the company can quickly improve the mobile user experience. For smartphone users they’re delivering a clean, simple website designed in accordance to many mobile best practices.  However with 300 KB of content it is on the heavy side.  Trimming down the size of the site delivering fewer and lighter content could lead to faster downloads.

But the big question is: Why such is the site so slow for the iPad user?  Firstly, they’re delivering up to 2 MB of content with over 150 elements.  They aren’t consistently combining Cascading Style Sheets or JavaScript, have over-sized images and aren’t following other W3C best practices. 

Worse yet, they make the iPad user go through a 3 step registration process that isn’t required of smartphone users.  Mobile websites are important for all retailers because they’re far more discoverable than apps which require a download from an app store.  Three additional steps needed to get to a home page increases the likelihood of user abandonment.  Requiring upfront registration and collecting information is very common in Social Retail. But if fake information will get you to the destination, companies should weigh what’s gained in collecting junk data against the potential loss of real prospects.

Related Articles:

1. At what costs do mobile gaming sites stay competitive on performance?

2. Fast, Fun & Touch-Friendly: The New Rules For Tablet Websites

3. Web Performance, More than just Speed

September 3, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The advantages of the Cloud

As we’ve mentioned here before, adopting cloud computing strategies can generate transformative advantages for IT organizations, but not without important considerations. Reducing cost and improving user experience can be achieved by moving applications and infrastructure to the cloud.

So how do CIOs get started, and more importantly, enforce and improve the quality of service they deliver to the business in a cloud paradigm? Vik Chaudhary recently spoke with the editors at CIO Insight on how companies can take advantage of the cloud with three straightforward recommendations.View The Video

July 2, 2012 Posted by | cloud application monitoring, cloud monitoring, cloud performance monitoring, Mobile Monitoring, Mobile Quality, mobile testing, site monitoring, web application monitoring, Web Monitoring, web performance, Website availability monitoring, website monitoring, website monitoring services, Website Performance | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fast, Fun & Touch-Friendly: The New Rules For Tablet Websites

In the post-PC era, tablets are taking on a central role in connecting consumer and business users with their online worlds. But touch-based tablets present an entirely different interface from the point-and-click paradigm of the desk- or laptop-bound Web.

Tablet users on the go are frequently stymied by the inherent sluggishness of cellular network connections. It’s not an impossible task, though, to create tablet website experiences that satisfy user expectations and, with a little effort, leverage the tablet interface.

Benchmark recently sat down with Keynote Mobile Performance Evangelist Herman Ng to get his insight into the tablet website experience, and get a few pointers on how to make it better.

 

A Conversation with Mobile Performance Evangelist Herman Ng

April 24, 2012 Posted by | web performance, Web Performance Testing, Website Performance, Website Performance Monitoring | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ensuring Mobile App Performance

mobile app testing

Mobile App Performance

Where in the world are your customers today? Are they at home, at work, or somewhere in between? At a soccer game? The gym?
And what about your employees? Are they at a customer site? In an important meeting in a company hallway? Or working from home today?
It’s nothing new that customers and employees are all over the place and on the go with mobile or tablet. They’ve got their e-mail in their hand while they’re waiting in line at the grocery store, and the company price list on their iPad while they’re sitting across the desk from a prospect.
Companies may now recognize the compelling need to reach customers and employees through mobile apps, but getting those apps built, tested, and to market is a new and complex challenge. Mobile is a many times more fragmented ecosystem than the desktop environment. Existing, “traditional” software development protocols need to be adapted; more importantly, mobile requires an entirely different set of quality assurance and performance protocols.
Rather than testing software in a single operating system environment, mobile apps requires development and mobile testing for as many as five OS platforms — iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Windows, and Symbian. Complicate that further with a multitude of devices, each with its own form factor and display characteristics, add in the nuances of various cellular carriers both domestic and international, and you have a test scenario sure to send even the most sophisticated IT department reaching for the aspirin bottle.
It doesn’t have to be such a headache, though. An effective, expeditious alternative is to go outside and utilize independent testing and monitoring partners that already have mobile infrastructures in place. The partner then becomes responsible for procuring the handsets and other devices, and establishing the carrier contracts in various geographies, typically on a scale far broader than would be realistic for an in-house department to manage. Such outsourcing is the direction the market is taking. International Data Corporation projects worldwide testing services to grow more than 15% a year through 2015, from a total spend of $9.4 billion in 2010 — and mobile applications are a fast-growing part of that total.4

Source : keynote.com

April 10, 2012 Posted by | Mobile Monitoring, Mobile Quality, mobile testing, web application monitoring, Web Load Testing | , , , , | Leave a comment