Web Monitoring

Web Site Monitoring and Performance Insights

Speed and Tenacity: the Apple iPad Outage

We’ve heard a lot recently about the importance of speed and performance when it comes to online retail. The New York Times highlighted research from Microsoft claiming that 250 milliseconds—a mere eye blink—could make the difference between a repeat visitor and a lost customer. And a popular infographic touts that Amazon would stand to lose $1.6 billion in sales per year from a 1 second web page delay. Our friends at Walmart.com have also shared some awesome research linking web performance to conversion.

These statistics are welcome news for the web performance community. But sometimes they don’t apply. With Apple, a lot of rules don’t apply.

This past weekend, Apple sold a record 3 million new iPad 3 tablets. That’s pretty phenomenal. Yet, it came on the back of a pretty bad outage only 10 days before.Apple-store-scatter

On March 7, Apple announced the new iPad 3. For effectively the entire day, the Apple Store was unavailable. That meant no one could check out the new iPad, nor purchase iPhones, MacBooks or anything else.

To Apple’s credit, the Apple store normally runs very quickly—averaging well less than 2 seconds for total User Experience Time and less a second for Time to First Paint. (The Apple Store is a member of the Keynote Retail Performance Index, measured with Keynote Transaction Perspective.)

We’ve written previously about the concept of tenacity. A website visitor’s tolerance for errors, or delays, is a major factor when balancing the cost and benefit of building capacity and engineering performance into Web applications. While Apple’s fanatic customer base is an extreme, it illustrates the point that there’s a continuum of performance expectations for users.

Apple-store-trend Your product/service is unique. And your customers are also unique. Keynote web load testing consultants dig into web analytics to model user behavior. They consider familiarity, tenacity, interaction speed and connection speed when developing virtual user profiles. It may be unrealistic for you to understand how different levels of performance impact your various customer types across all these variables. But if you can begin to understand them, you’ll be in a better position for setting ongoing performance goals and SLAs—especially around tolerances for outliers from your averages.

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June 15, 2012 Posted by | cloud application monitoring, cloud monitoring, cloud performance monitoring, Mobile Monitoring, Mobile Quality, mobile testing, transaction monitoring, web application monitoring, Web Load Testing, Web Monitoring, website monitoring, website monitoring services, Website Performance, Website Performance Monitoring | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Mobile Web: What Consumers Prefer

Unfortunately, if you are looking to consumers to help solve the app-or-website dilemma, they’re not going to be much help. Some demographic trends are fairly clear, but overall, consumer preference is not overwhelmingly in one camp or the other. Use cases drive many preferences. The same goes for developers and marketers.

A 2010 study by Keynote for Adobe Systems of 1,200 U.S. consumers found roughly equal satisfaction with app and browser experiences, and that users spend about an equal amount of time with each. Two-thirds expressed a preference for browsers when accessing media and entertainment and consumer products/shopping, though again, satisfaction in these categories was neck-and-neck for both websites and apps. Categories where users in the study showed a clear preference for apps were games, social media, maps and music.

Unfortunately, if you are looking to consumers to help solve the app-or-website dilemma, they’re not going to be much help. Some demographic trends are fairly clear, but overall, consumer preference is not overwhelmingly in one camp or the other. Use cases drive many preferences. The same goes for developers and marketers.

Read about Mobile monitoring and  Mobile device application testing with Keynote.

A 2010 study by Keynote for Adobe Systems of 1,200 U.S. consumers found roughly equal satisfaction with app and browser experiences, and that users spend about an equal amount of time with each. Two-thirds expressed a preference for browsers when accessing media and entertainment and consumer products/shopping, though again, satisfaction in these categories was neck-and-neck for both websites and apps. Categories where users in the study showed a clear preference for apps were games, social media, maps and music.

Read More at The Mobile Dilemma

 

November 15, 2011 Posted by | Mobile Monitoring, Mobile Quality | , , , , | Leave a comment

A System to Monitor the Everywhere Web

Today, your customers are perusing your merchandise and buying from your mobile and Web sites using a vast array of devices, including desktop PCs, smartphones, cell phones, wireless laptops, and tablet computers from wherever they’re located, anytime.

This new “Everywhere Web” is a place where customer expectations are high, and if you want to prosper, you certainly want to ensure that your web and mobile quality always deliver for all of your customers, with no excuses. Don’t disappoint them with an online experience that is slow or that doesn’t serve them. If your sites don’t sell to them when they want to buy from you, those customers may not come back.

To win them over and drive sales, your company needs to stay on top of all the new devices that your customers are using to find you online. That means ensuring that your site performance is ready to meet the needs of all of that device diversity. Making it even more complex are new electronic devices such as tablet PCs and iPads that blur the lines between traditional desktop computing and the mobile world.

It may seem like a lot to worry about, but by following a performance monitoring strategy that keeps up with new devices and Web services accessed by these devices, you can turn this challenge into a competitive strength for your business.

The place to start is with benchmarks to establish online performance goals for all your online sites that can then be monitored, measured and improved over time. The needs of broadband and mobile users are quite different, so you should be benchmarking both types. Broadband sites include far more graphics and audio-hungry features, because there is speed to spare to deliver them. Mobile sites are usually pared down to get out just the basic information to customers, while cutting out the flashy extras due to mobile bandwidth and screen size limitations.

Source : http://keynote.com/benchmark/mobile_wireless/article_industry_focus_everywhere_web.shtml

October 19, 2011 Posted by | Mobile Quality, web performance, website monitoring | , , , , | Leave a comment