Web Monitoring

Web Site Monitoring and Performance Insights

Software-as-a-Service at Last?

After years of latency, software-as-a-service is moving to center stage, swept along with the bigger concept of cloud computing. On the software side, applications like Salesforce, Workday and Freshbooks — and yes, GoogleApps — have become serious players in enterprises of all sizes.

And in the bigger cloud, services like Amazon’s EC2 Elastic Compute Cloud and IBM Smart cloud services — and yes, Google AppEngine — are changing the way IT departments approach their missions and their development tasks, enabling greater speed and flexibility than ever before.

We’ve seen this type of technology trajectory before and can recognize its course; think back to the Web itself, to early social networking, to the still-snowballing mobile data market.

The dominant SaaS providers are still rising to the top; economics, standards and best practices are being sorted out; business models are being built and business cases made. The difference is that these sweeping technological changes keep happening faster and faster.

You may also would like to see:

1. The future: For everything an API

2. Cloud application performance monitoring

3. Cloud Testing – SaaS 

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January 6, 2014 Posted by | cloud performance monitoring | , , | Leave a comment

Various Cloud Monitoring Service Approaches

The cloud computing industry represents a large ecosystem of many models, vendors, and market niches. This definition attempts to encompass all of the various cloud monitoring service approaches.

Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to use the Provider’s applications running on a cloud infrastructure. The applications are accessible from various client devices through a thin client interface such as a web browser (e.g., web-based email). The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network, servers, operating systems, storage, or even individual application capabilities, with the possible exception of Limited user-specific application configuration settings.

Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to deploy onto the cloud infrastructure consumer-created or acquired applications created using programming languages and tools supported by the provider. The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network, servers, operating systems, or storage, but has control over the deployed applications and possibly application hosting environment configurations.

Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to provision processing, storage, networks, and other fundamental computing resources where the consumer is able to deploy and run arbitrary software, which can include operating systems and applications. The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure but has control over operating systems; storage, deployed applications, and possibly limited control of select networking components (e.g., host firewalls).

You may also would like to see:

1. Cloud Performance Monitoring

2. Keynote Cloud Monitoring Solutions

3. The Four Types of Clouds Explained

November 19, 2013 Posted by | cloud monitoring, cloud performance monitoring, Customer Experience | , , , , | Leave a comment